Odysseus Unbound - The Search for Homer’s Ithaca

Events

Sep 07 2009 10:00

EAGE 2009, Dublin - 15th European Meeting of Environmental and Engineering Geophysics

Geophysics in the Search for Homer’s Ithaca

Presented by Greg Hodges, Fugro Airborne Surveys; co-authors D. Kilcoyne (Fugro-Aperio), R. Eddies (Fugro-Aperio) & J.R. Underhill (University of Edinburgh)

The Odysseus Unbound project includes analysis of the Paliki peninsula for supporting evidence that it was once the island of Ithaca, home of Odysseus. Geophysical surveys including airborne EM (magnetometry, conductivity and LIDAR), marine seismic surveys (sidescan sonar, multibeam and sub-bottom profiling) and ground-based techniques (resistivity, magnetometry, gravity and seismic refraction) are being used to read the geological history of this island over the last 3200 years.

EAGE is a professional association for geoscientists and engineers. It is a European based organization with a worldwide membership providing a global network of commercial and academic professionals to all members. The association is truly multi-disciplinary and international in form and pursuits. All members of EAGE are professionally involved in (or studying) geophysics, petroleum exploration, geology, reservoir engineering, mining and civil engineering. The EAGE operates two divisions: the Oil & Gas Geoscience Division and the Near Surface Geoscience Division.

Click here for Program - Venue - Registration

Click here for the conference paper (3 Mb PDF)

Mar 29 - Apr 2 2009

SAGEEP 2009, Fort Worth, Texas

Geophysics in the Search for Homer’s Ithaca

Greg Hodges, Chief Geophysicist, Fugro Airborne Surveys

The Odysseus Unbound project includes analysis of the Paliki peninsula for supporting evidence that it was once the island of Ithaca, home of Odysseus. Geophysical surveys including airborne EM (magnetometry, conductivity and LIDAR), marine seismic surveys (sidescan sonar, multibeam and sub-bottom profiling) and ground-based techniques (resistivity, magnetometry, gravity and seismic refraction) are being used to read the geological history of this island over the last 3200 years.

SAGEEP is the Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Environmental and Engineering Problems, organised by the Environmental and Engineering Geophysical Society (EEGS).

Click here for Program - Venue - Registration

This presentation was delivered as a Keynote Session on the morning of Tuesday March 31.

Click here for the conference paper (3 Mb PDF)

Mar 25 2009 17:30

Shell University Lecture Series - 2009, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ

Where was Odysseus' homeland? The geological, geomorphological and geophysical evidence for relocating Homer’s Ithaca.

Professor John Underhill, University of Edinburgh

John Underhill has been leading the scientific tests of Robert Bittlestone's theory that the Paliki peninsula in western Kefalonia might have been a free-standing island as recently as 3,000 years ago. Confirmation of that hypothesis would have dramatic ramifications for our understanding of Homeric Greece.

17.30 Lecture begins; 18:30 Short reception; 19:30 Depart.

Entry to all Shell London Lecture Series events is free to all, but by ticket only. To obtain a ticket please contact Alys Hilbourne (alys.hilbourne@geolsoc.org.uk, +44 (0) 20 7432 0981). Please note that due to the popularity of the lecture series, tickets will be allocated on a monthly basis.

Further details are available at the Geological Society website.

This presentation is a private academic event. Non-members wishing to attend should check with the organisers whether this is permitted.

Mar 5 2009 18:00

Lyell Lecture, University of London

Where was Odysseus’ homeland? The geological, geomorphological and geophysical evidence for relocating Homer’s Ithaca.

Professor John Underhill, University of Edinburgh

John Underhill has been leading the scientific tests of Robert Bittlestone's theory that the Paliki peninsula in western Kefalonia might have been a free-standing island as recently as 3,000 years ago. Confirmation of that hypothesis would have dramatic ramifications for our understanding of Homeric Greece.

Thursday March 5 18:00 - 19:00. Department of Earth Sciences, Queens Building, Royal Holloway and Bedford New College , University of London, Egham Hill, Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX.

Click here to read about Charles Lyell. Click here for the department office.

This presentation is a private academic event. Non-members wishing to attend should check with the organisers whether this is permitted.

Mar 3 2009 15:00

Edinburgh University Geology Society

Where was Odysseus’ homeland? The geological, geomorphological and geophysical evidence for relocating Homer’s Ithaca.

Professor John Underhill, University of Edinburgh

John Underhill has been leading the scientific tests of Robert Bittlestone's theory that the Paliki peninsula in western Kefalonia might have been a free-standing island as recently as 3,000 years ago. Confirmation of that hypothesis would have dramatic ramifications for our understanding of Homeric Greece.

Tuesday March 3 at 15:00. Main Lecture Room, Grant Institute of Earth Science, School of Geosciences, The University of Edinburgh, The King's Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3JW.

This presentation is a private society event: non-members wishing to attend should check with the organisers or contact the School of Geosciences.

"After coming along to your talk, I feel inspired again as to why I am doing my degree!! Thanks so much for such a refreshing and exciting talk; and I know I am not the only one who felt like that!"

Feb 21 2009 18:00

The 52nd Irish Geological Research Meeting, Dublin

Where was Odysseus’ homeland? The geological, geomorphological and geophysical evidence for relocating Homer’s Ithaca.

Professor John Underhill, University of Edinburgh

John Underhill has been leading the scientific tests of Robert Bittlestone's theory that the Paliki peninsula in western Kefalonia might have been a free-standing island as recently as 3,000 years ago. Confirmation of that hypothesis would have dramatic ramifications for our understanding of Homeric Greece.

Saturday Feb 21, 18:00 - 19:00. Walton Theatre, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin.

Provisional IGRM Programme. IGA Event Listing. Further details: David Chew

"Thank you for so generously giving us your time, energy and enthusiasm. Your lecture was a tour de force - it absolutely hit the spot. Right or wrong, it is a wonderful hypothesis to be testing."

"Thank you for a riveting talk on Saturday night. I turned around to look at the audience towards the end of your talk, and everyone seemed captivated to the very last minute."

Feb 16 2009 17:00

The Sedgwick Club, Cambridge

The Geological, Geophysical and Geomorphic Evidence for relocating Odysseus' Homeland, Ancient Ithaca.

Professor John Underhill, University of Edinburgh

John Underhill has been leading the scientific tests of Robert Bittlestone's theory that the Paliki peninsula in western Kefalonia might have been a free-standing island as recently as 3,000 years ago. Confirmation of that hypothesis would have dramatic ramifications for our understanding of Homeric Greece.

Monday Feb 16, 17:00 - 18:00, Harker Room 1, Department of Earth Sciences, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EQ

For information about the Sedgwick Club contact Anne Forbes

There is no charge for admission and non-members are also welcome, but this is subject to limited room capacity.

Venue details.

Feb 5 2009 18:00

Geological Society of London, Burlington House, W1J 0BG

Where was Odysseus' homeland? The geological, geomorphological and geophysical evidence for relocating Homer’s Ithaca.

Professor John Underhill, University of Edinburgh

*** The first presentation of this lecture on October 2 2008 was over-subscribed and so this repeat event has been arranged to enable more delegates to attend. Early reservation is recommended: see details below. ***

John Underhill has been leading the scientific tests of Robert Bittlestone's theory that the Paliki peninsula in western Kefalonia might have been a free-standing island as recently as 3,000 years ago. Confirmation of that hypothesis would have dramatic ramifications for our understanding of Homeric Greece.

17.30 Tea, coffee and biscuits; 18.00 Lecture begins; 19.00 Short reception; 20.00 Depart.

Entry to all Shell London Lecture Series events is free to all, but by ticket only. To obtain a ticket please contact Alys Hilbourne (alys.hilbourne@geolsoc.org.uk, +44 (0) 20 7432 0981). Please note that due to the popularity of the lecture series, tickets will be allocated on a monthly basis.

Further details are available at the Geological Society website.

"Having read all about your work on this amazing Project in Geoscientist, I knew that I would enjoy your lecture - and I did! Very well done!"

"Having read Homer and had a couple of hours ashore in Ithaca 15 years go, I really enjoyed your lecture which was a model of clarity, audibility and content for a layman like me! It was the best one of all the 10+ Shell lectures I have attended."

Feb 2 2009 18:30

The Scottish Hellenic Society of Edinburgh

Edinburgh University, Faculty Room South, David Hume Tower, George Square, Edinburgh EH8 9JX

The Geological, Geophysical and Geomorphic Evidence for relocating Odysseus' Homeland, Ancient Ithaca.

Professor John Underhill, University of Edinburgh

John Underhill has been leading the scientific tests of Robert Bittlestone's theory that the Paliki peninsula in western Kefalonia might have been a free-standing island as recently as 3,000 years ago. Confirmation of that hypothesis would have dramatic ramifications for our understanding of Homeric Greece.

Doors open 18:30. Lecture starts 19:00. Further information and reservations: Dr Katerina Kolotourou.

SHS President Professor Keith Rutter writes: "What a wonderful evening you gave us yesterday… Your positive and enthusiastic experiences of Greece were just what the Hellenic Society exists to promote, and we look forward to hearing of further results in due course. Meanwhile all the very best for this year's investigations."

Jan 19 2009 19:00

Royal Grammar School, Guildford, Surrey

WHERE WAS Homer’s ITHACA?

It’s the oldest marine adventure in the world. It was already ancient history when Aristotle and Socrates were in the cradle. It has spawned a hundred spin-offs and inspired writers and artists, philosophers and poets, statesmen and soldiers for the last three thousand years. It’s Homer’s original Odyssey: a Bronze Age blockbuster and a cornerstone of Western civilisation. And not surprisingly, most people have presumed that Odysseus’ homeland of Ithaca is as imaginary as Ithilien in Lord of the Rings.

Robert Bittlestone, James Diggle and John Underhill think they’re wrong. On Monday January 19 the authors of Odysseus Unbound: The Search for Homer’s Ithaca will present their proposal and the latest discoveries on the island of Cephalonia that can help us decide on whether it really is the Ithaca described in Homer’s Odyssey. No prior knowledge of the subject is assumed although those studying classics or geology will find it especially relevant. The talk will be illustrated throughout with slides, film clips and satellite images.

Parents, students and staff from RGS and neighbouring schools are warmly invited to attend, subject to capacity. There is no charge for admission and the presentation will start at 7.00 p.m. After the talk the speakers will be available to sign copies of their book "Odysseus Unbound: The Search for Homer’s Ithaca" which will be offered to attendees at the special price of £25.

For a location map, click here. For further information and to reserve your seats, contact Head of Classics Jimmy Pressley, j.pressley@rgs-guildford.co.uk

Click here for further details. A4 leaflet. Display poster.

James Diggle, John Underhill and Robert Bittlestone spoke to a packed lecture hall of enthusiastic students and parents, ending in a book-signing for "Odysseus Unbound". Jimmy Pressley writes:

James Diggle, Robert Bittlestone & John Underhill Robert Bittlestone, Ed Bush, Mike Lambert, David Woolcott, Alex Murray-Bruce, James Diggle & Jimmy Pressley

"Thank you for coming to Guildford to deliver such an inspirational talk to the RGS Classics Society. As a department, we are well aware - in the current climate - of the importance of the image of Classics and the future of classical subjects. Trying to inspire and enthuse the students both inside and outside the classroom; trying to nurture a love of learning; trying to stretch our students to explore areas beyond the immediate limitations of the syllabus are all central to our belief. Your talk did so much to achieve each of these goals. It is testament to the attraction of the theory and the subject matter that such a large audience attended.; the cross-curricular nature of the talk certainly ensured it appealed to a diverse range of interests. Parents, boys and colleagues have been effusive in their praise for your presentation and a running theme has been a desire to see where the journey takes you to next. I really am extremely grateful to you all for your time and effort and I wish you all the very best for the future".